FEBRUARY IS AMERICAN HEART AWARENESS MONTH

PRESS RELEASES   2/1/2019
Cardiovascular diseases, including stroke, are our nation's No. 1 killer. To urge Americans to join the battle against these diseases, since 1963 Congress has required the president to proclaim February "American Heart Month."

Although heart disease is sometimes thought of as a "man's disease," it is the leading cause of death for both women and men in the United States. Reduce your chance of developing coronary heart disease by taking steps to prevent and control risk factors. Knowing the signs and symptoms of heart attack are crucial to the most positive outcomes after having a heart attack.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and is a major cause of disability. The most common heart disease in the United States is coronary heart disease, which often appears as a heart attack. In 2008, an estimated 770,000 Americans will have a new coronary attack, and about 430,000 will have a recurrent attack. About every 26 seconds, an American will have a coronary event, and about one every minute will die from one.The chance of developing coronary heart disease can be reduced by taking steps to prevent and control factors that put people at greater risk. Additionally, knowing the signs and symptoms of heart attack are crucial to the most positive outcomes after having a heart attack. People who have survived a heart attack can also work to reduce their risk of another heart attack or a stroke in the future.

Some heart attacks are sudden and intense; however, most heart attacks start slowly, with mild pain or discomfort. Often people affected aren't sure what's wrong and wait too long before getting help. Here are signs that can mean a heart attack is happening:

Chest discomfort. Most heart attacks involve discomfort in the center of the chest that lasts more than a few minutes, or that goes away and comes back. It can feel like uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain.
Discomfort in other areas of the upper body. Symptoms can include pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw, or stomach.
Shortness of breath. May occur with or without chest discomfort.
Other signs. These may include breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea, or lightheadedness.


Information provided by:
http://www.cdc.gov/features/heartmonth/
www.americanheart.org